How Sausage is Made

How Sausage is Made

Stocks sold off this week as Congress debated the replacement bill for Obamacare. The S&P 500 was down a little over 1 percent over the past five sessions. Bonds rallied on stock weakness with the 10-year Treasury finishing the week at a 2.40 percent yield.

No Brackets Busted by the Fed

No Brackets Busted by the Fed

As traders were nursing their wounds from early bracket pains, the market saw that U.S. stocks were muted this week, up 0.2 percent. Investors’ reactions to finally getting the anticipated Fed rate hike were tempered by oil production figures from OPEC, causing concern early in the week. 

Milestones

Milestones

This week, investors recognized the 8-year anniversary of a bull market that is now second only in length to the tech-fueled run of the 1990s. In March, blue chip stocks consolidated a small portion of recent gains, but nevertheless, the S&P 500 has now returned over 250 percent since the bear market lows in March of 2009.

Black Jack

Black Jack

Stocks posted a 0.5 percent return this week as investors became more confident in economic and fiscal policies. The Dow Jones Industrial Average passed 21,000 for the first time and equities posted their first 1 percent day in over four months.

Christianson, Frankel and Jones Receive Promotions

Ferguson Wellman Capital Management recently promoted three professionals, Scott Christianson, CFP®, Josh Frankel, CFP®, and Peter Jones. Christianson has been promoted to senior vice president, Frankel, has been promoted to executive vice president and Peter Jones has been promoted to vice president.

Frankie Says Relax

Frankie Says Relax

Stocks ended the week marginally higher as U.S. economic data continued to generate positive headlines. Though regional manufacturing surveys around the U.S. are showing improving growth, retail earnings this week were mixed as some companies cited that delays in tax returns were effecting spending. As tax refunds are running $60 billion below average thus far this year.

Borderline

Borderline

For the week, the equity markets were higher by about 1.15 percent as investors absorbed Janet Yellen's testimony to Congress and the stronger-than-expected economic data that was posted. Interest rates were higher with the 10-year U.S. Treasury climbing in yield from 2.39 percent to 2.41 percent.

The Yin and Yang of It All

The Yin and Yang of It All

It was another solid week in the markets. The S&P 500 was up almost 1 percent to record highs. Interest rates were relatively quiet with the 10-year Treasury finishing the week yielding 2.40 percent. Oil rallied modestly and is now up to $54.00 per barrel.

Good News First

Good News First

Friday’s jobs numbers propelled stocks to roughly break even on the week. While the gain of 227,000 jobs in January was meaningfully above the estimate of 175,000, the unemployment rate ticked up and wage growth ticked down. The increase from 4.7 percent to 4.8 percent in the unemployment rate was due to more people entering the labor force, thus not much of a negative.

Tapping the Commercial Real Estate Market

Tapping the Commercial Real Estate Market

The equity markets were higher by about 1.3 percent compared to last week as investors absorbed fourth quarter earnings and reacted to the changes in Washington. Interest rates were higher, with the 10-year Treasury climbing in yield from 2.39 percent to 2.49 percent. The Dow Jones Industrial Average crossed 20,000 this week but the real story is how long it took to get here.

Winds of Change

Winds of Change

What has become known as the Trump Trade has delivered strong equity returns since election day last fall, with the benchmark S&P 500 rising by 6.5 percent over this period. More remarkable is the fact that the blue chip index hasn’t experienced a 1 percent or greater loss since October 11, 2016.

Getting Ahead of Ourselves

Getting Ahead of Ourselves

After rallying into the end of the year, both interest rates and the market took a little breather this week. The S&P 500 finished the week basically flat, while the yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury finished at 2.40 percent. A quiet week as we head into earnings season.

Ferguson Wellman Recognized as One of Portland Business Journal's Most Admired Companies

Ferguson Wellman Capital Management has been named by Portland Business Journal as a “Most Admired Company.” Of the 10 financial services companies listed in the top tier, Ferguson Wellman was ranked second. Over 127 companies received votes in the financial services category.

Show Me the Money

Show Me the Money

The Friday job report was slightly on the light side with December payrolls coming in at 156,000, 19,000 below economist’s estimates. Positively, the previous two months showed 19,000 in upward revisions. However, wages grew at their highest rate since June 2009, coming in at 2.9 percent year-over-year growth.

Outlook 2017

Eight years into a bull market, and U.S. stocks have pulled off a command performance in 2016. Brexit and a Republican sweep of the fall elections were outcomes that few anticipated, and ones that failed to produce the investment outcomes that many predicted. As the political landscape changed,

Financial Planning Magazine Names Ferguson Wellman on Top Registered Investment Advisers List

Ferguson Wellman Capital Management was recently informed that the firm was named by Financial Planning to their “Top 150 Registered Investment Advisers Firms.” Specifically, the firm was named 11 on their list of “Top 20 Firms.”

Baby What a Big Surprise

Baby What a Big Surprise

It was a relatively quiet week in capital markets. Trading volume was very low, and the S&P 500 was down 1 percent. Interest rates were also down for the week with the 10-year U.S. Treasury finishing the week at 2.44 percent.