A New Face

A New Face

The markets had to digest weighty geopolitical headlines this week with tariffs, North Korea and a messy political landscape in the European Union dominating the news cycle.

More Bang for Your Buck

More Bang for Your Buck

In our annual economic Investment Outlook, we predicted that interest rates would rise but not enough to derail the expansion. At the same time, we anticipated that the conflicting signals of robust earnings growth and above-average valuation would settle somewhere in the middle.

The Hardest Thing to Understand, According to Einstein

The Hardest Thing to Understand, According to Einstein

According to Einstein, what’s the hardest thing to understand in the world? Josh Frankel, CFP, helps find relativity between taxpayers and wealth planning, particularly charitable-giving strategies.

Texas Tea

Texas Tea

One of the four takeaways in our 2018 Outlook was, “It’s the Economy,” meaning that over the long term, financial markets tend to do a good job shrugging off headline risk and political drama. Instead, markets focus on the health of the economy. This attribute was once again demonstrated this week with equity markets gaining more than 2 percent despite heightened geopolitical tension as the U.S. formally exited the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. 

A Tale of Two Headlines

A Tale of Two Headlines

Charles Dicken’s iconic tome illustrates aptly the interplay between earnings news and economic news of late. Every day it seems good earning news is complemented with slowing economic news and vice versa. Recent market volatility has pushed cautious investors to the sidelines and those that remain are riding the markets up and down with every recent news release.  

Choose Your Own Adventure

Choose Your Own Adventure

Stock markets were essentially flat for the week, but individual stocks gyrated with earnings announcements. Economic data continues to be solid, but not spectacular. First quarter U.S. GDP came in at 2.3 percent, marking the fastest first quarter growth since 2015. Interest rates were essentially unchanged for the week as well.

iCan't Afford This

iCan't Afford This

Stocks and bonds moved in opposite directions as the S&P 500 finished positive on the week despite falling nearly 2 percent between Thursday and Friday. Bonds, on the other hand, declined due to higher interest rates.

Back to Basics

Back to Basics

With this week’s latest rebound, the S&P 500 has now closed up or down more than 1 percent 27 times year-to-date ‒ this is more than three times the daily volatility that investors experienced in 2017. Accompanying higher stock prices, safe-haven bonds retreated modestly.

It's Always Something

It's Always Something

With trade tensions picking up, the S&P 500 experienced a wild ride this week, ending the week declining more than 1 percent. The first week of trading in the second quarter experienced huge intraday swings, highlighted by Wednesday’s volatility.

2018 Market Letter Q2

2018 Market Letter Q2

2018 Market Letter Q2

There's No Place Like Home

There's No Place Like Home

The S&P 500 put up strong gains into the holiday and finished up 2 percent for the week. This quarter has been marked by the return of volatility with the market posting daily gains or losses in excess of 1 percent on 22 different occasions. To put this in perspective, there were just eight of these instances in all of 2017.

Will Facebook Find Some Friends?

Will Facebook Find Some Friends?

In the face of unquestionably strong economic data, global equities declined nearly 5 percent on the week with the S&P 500 falling close to 6 percent. The sharp selloff can be attributed to a confluence of factors, none of which will have any impact on near-term earnings momentum.

Cole and Fovinci Quoted in The Bend Bulletin

Cole and Fovinci Quoted in The Bend Bulletin

Investment advisers offer positive outlook to Central Oregon clients
A Portland-based investment manager reassured high-net-worth clients in Bend on Tuesday evening that good times will continue this year, but the audience met that outlook with skepticism and questions.

50 Shades of Beige

50 Shades of Beige

U.S. factory production exceeded growth expectations and the University of Michigan consumer confidence survey came in at a 14-year high, helping U.S. stocks to break out of their four-day slump (triggered by tariffs and White House turmoil). However, it won’t be enough to turn in positive numbers for the week.

There's a New Tariff in Town

There's a New Tariff in Town

Strong economic data led the market to big gains this week, despite President Trump’s tariff announcement. The S&P 500 was up over 3 percent, while bond yields were quiet on the week. Volatility has indeed returned to the market with three-out-of-five days experiencing more-than-1-percent swings in value.

Fed Chair Powell - Yellen 2.0

Fed Chair Powell - Yellen 2.0

For the week the equity markets were lower by more than three percent as investors reacted to the news that President Trump intends to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports fueling fear of protectionist economic policy.

Piling It On

Piling It On

Global equity markets were up slightly this week after the U.S. experienced its greatest one-week gain since 2011 in the previous week. Interest rates took a pause in their upward move with the 10-Year Treasury flat on the week at 2.87 percent. 

Back In Business

Back In Business

Following the stock market’s first correction since the Chinese growth scare two years ago, blue-chip stocks have rebounded furiously, producing the best week of returns since December of 2011. Investors spooked by the rapid descent of stock prices earlier this month are now scrambling to get back in.